Canister launch of n-capable Agni-V missile successful

Bhubaneswar, Jan 31 (IANS) India Saturday successfully conducted the first canister-based trial of its nuclear-capable Agni-V missile, which is capable of hitting targets over 5,000 km away, from a military base in Odisha, an official said.

The missile, which has the ability to hit targets deep inside China, was fired from a mobile vehicle at the Inner Wheeler Island launch site in Bhadrak district, about 200 km from Bhubaneswar.
The launch came on the day Avinash Chander, who played a key role in the missile’s development, demited office as head of the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) after his tenure was cut short by 15 months.
“It is a canisterised version of the longest-range missile. It was tested for the first time from a canister. The test was successful,” test range director M.V.K.V. Prasad told IANS.
This was the third launch of the missile, but the first from a canister which would provide the armed forces with operational flexibility to pick and choose from where to launch the missile.
A canister launch system of the 50 tonne, 17-metre-long and 2-metre-circumference missile gives the forces the ability to transport it by road and rail.

Canister launch of n-capable Agni V missile successful

Bhubaneswar, Jan 31 (IANS) India Saturday successfully conducted the first canister-based trial of its nuclear capable Agni-V missile, which is capable of hitting targets over 5,000 km away, from a military base in Odisha, an official said.

The long range missile was fired from a mobile vehicle at the Inner Wheeler Island, a launch site in the district of Bhadrak, about 200 km from Bhubaneswar.
“It is a canisterised version of the longest range missile. It was tested for the first time from a canister. The test was successful,” test range director M.V.K.V. Prasad told IANS.
This was the third launch of the missile, but the first from a canister which would provide the armed forces with operational flexibility to pick and choose from where to launch the missiles.
A canister launch system of the 17 metres long and 2 metres wide missile, which has a launch weight of around 50 tonnes gives the forces the ability to transport the missile by road and rail.